{{LEFT}}

Matte Surface

The Matte Surface shader is for solid materials which don’t have transparency and which are not reflective. Materials like dirt, plaster and concrete are its domain. It’s most often used in the Medium to Interactive zones of the scene.

image00

As seen in Maya the controls are:

Shader library 2014 Docs (3)

Sampling anisotropy can generally be left at 4x. It’s the number of passes made to reduce aliasing or “jaggies” on textures that have high contrast (e.g. checkerboard floor patterns) as they get farther away from camera.

The “diffuse sampler” is the base color texture painted on the surface. It uses the UV set indicated by “UV” to map onto the object.

The normal sampler points to an RGB color texture generated with one of several available tools (NVidia has a Photoshop plug-in). It uses the same UV set as the base color texture.

The ambient sampler is a “latitude longitude” panorama sphere seen from at or very near the object position in the scene. It can be either rendered or made from a photo panorama, but in any case can be of modest resolution and heavily blurred. Intensity is the “on / off” for the effect. Softness further blurs the ambient effect on the surface, making it harder and shinier or softer and duller.

An excellent source of detailed information on shooting and processing HDR photo panoramas can be found on Christian Bloch’s HDRLabs web site. The section on sIBL inspired significant aspects of these shaders.

The light map is described in the previous section. It is a black/white texture representing pre-rendered (baked) lighting on the object. It can use a different UV set from the base color texture, in the “LightmapUV” parameter. Lightmap intensity is the on/off for this effect. Resolution of the light map need not be high.

The reason for allowing separate UVs sets is that often the base color will be a seamless texture, repeating on the surface, while the lightmap must not repeat, and uniquely map the whole object.

The Blinn-Phong point light has a color, a position in global coordinates of the scene, diffuse and specular strength and specular sharpness. It’s often useful to constrain the position to windows for interiors or the sun in outdoor scenes.

The final parameter rotates the ambient environment map on the global Y axis. This allows matching the ambient lighting to an environment bubble or cyclorama which may be positioned differently.

Setting up Multiple UV Sets

In order for these Multiple UV Set shaders to operate correctly, you will need to follow one simple guideline. The shader input “UV” requires the primary default UV Set. This means when viewing the UV Sets in Create UVs > UV Set Editor, the top UV Set is the default, in this case map1. “UV2” can then be filled with the second UV Set. Look below for an example of two separate UV Sets applied to the same object.

uvSetEditor

uvs

{{RIGHT}}

Download

Download the Shader Library 2014 package from the Dashboard.

Materials

Concrete/Brick

Concrete

  • Bumpiness: 5
  • Ambient Intensity: 1.6
  • Ambient Softness: 7
  • Lightmap Intensity: 0
  • Diffuse Strength: 0.5
  • Specular Strength: 0
  • Specular Sharpness: 0

Rust

Rust

  • Bumpiness: 2.5
  • Ambient Intensity: 1.6
  • Ambient Softness: 6
  • Lightmap Intensity: 0
  • Diffuse Strength: 0.5
  • Specular Strength: 0.25
  • Specular Sharpness: 0

Fabric

Fabric

  • Bumpiness: 1.6
  • Ambient Intensity: 1.2
  • Ambient Softness: 7.5
  • Lightmap Intensity: 0
  • Diffuse Strength: 0
  • Specular Strength: 0.2
  • Specular Sharpness: 0

Wood

Wood

  • Bumpiness: 3
  • Ambient Intensity: 1.6
  • Ambient Softness: 7
  • Lightmap Intensity: 0
  • Diffuse Strength: 0.5
  • Specular Strength: 0
  • Specular Sharpness: 0

Download sample materials from the Dashboard, sample texture files provided by SurfaceMimic.